Forensic Sciences (FRSC)

The following courses are restricted to those students accepted into the Certificate in Forensic Sciences Program at Saint Mary’s University.  Courses in Forensic Science cannot be used to satisfy course requirements for the major or honours in Biology.

*All the following courses have 3 hour classes and 3 hour lab/tutorial per week.

FRSC 2200  Basic Sciences for Forensics I  
3 credit hours  
Prerequisite: acceptance into Certificate in Forensic Sciences Program

Faculty and external specialists from several scientific disciplines provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary nature of the application of sciences within Forensics. Applications include the collection, examination, evaluation and interpretation of physical evidence within the judiciary process of criminal investigation. Scientific theories and principles underlying these applications are examined.

Note: Please note that this course may not be used by BSc students to satisfy the requirement of a science elective under regulations 3e, 6e, 10c, and 12b for BSc degrees.
FRSC 2201  Basic Science for Forensics II  
3 credit hours  
Prerequisite: acceptance into Certificate in Forensic Sciences Program.

This course is a continuation of Basic Sciences for Forensics I.

Note: Please note that this course may not be used by BSc students to satisfy the requirement of a science elective under regulations 3e, 6e, 10c, and 12b for BSc degrees.
FRSC 3007  Forensic DNA Typing  [BIOL 3007]  
3 credit hours  
Prerequisite: BIOL 2307

Students study all aspects of forensic DNA typing protocols, and interpretation. Lectures focus on theory and laboratory sessions involve actual DNA typing, where students work with their own DNA. These skills are highly transferrable, and are applicable to the genetic analysis of populations in general.

FRSC 3310  Role of Science in Forensics  
3 credit hours  
Prerequisite: FRSC 2200 and 2201

Students gain the skills needed to develop a critical perspective regarding the science underlying the practice of different fields in forensics. These skills are applied to critique different fields, and to learn from the problems forensics has faced regarding a historical lack of scientific rigor.

FRSC 3350  Forensic Sciences in Practice  
3 credit hours  
Prerequisite: FRSC 2200 and 2201 and 3310

This is the capstone course for the certificate in Forensic Sciences Program. Students will integrate their learning from previous courses, gain a deeper understanding of areas of interest, and improve communication skills through student-centered activities, such as the completeion of research projects and collaboration with experts.

FRSC 3400  Forensic Human Anatomy  
3 credit hours  
Prerequisite: FRSC 2200 and FRSC 2201

Students are provided with a systematic approach to the study of human anatomy and the relation of structure design to facilitate function. Students investigate applied aspects of forensic anatomy of the deceased (cause and manner of death), as well as stress analyses and material properties of trauma and biomechanical forces acting on tissue.

FRSC 3801  Special Topics in Forensic Science  
3 credit hours  
FRSC 3876  Directed Studies in Forensic Science  
3 credit hours  

3 credit hours

FRSC 4002  Wildlife Forensics  [BIOL 4002]  
3 credit hours  
Prerequisite: BIOL 2307

The goals of this course are for students to learn about the techniques involved in wildlife forensics, how the resulting data are interpreted, and how this information is used in a legal setting. Although many aspects of wildlife forensics are covered, there is a focus on DNA methods. Classes 3 hrs. and lab 3 hrs. a week